All posts by: Clifford M. Chapman

As histologists, you should be familiar with the light microscope.  It is generally accepted that in 1674, Anthony van Leeuwenhoek invented the modern light microscope.  Though Robert Hooke hand-shaved thin slices of cork to view under a magnifying glass in...
Every pathology department and associated histology laboratory must have a chemical monitoring program.  It may be part of a larger Chemical Hygiene Plan.  Laboratory employees must be kept safe by providing information on dangers, explaining the ways in which employees...
Some specimens may be very tiny; on the order of less than 0.1 cm.  Some methods employ the use of mesh cassettes, “tea bag” biopsy pouches, sponges, wrapping paper, etc. in order to contain the specimen and prevent it from...
Questions and comments may be sent to articles@rankinbiomed.com Clifford M. Chapman, MS, HTL(ASCP), QIHC Senior Consultant Bioscience Solutions Group, LLC Email: cmc@bsg-labs.com Website: www.bsg-labs.com www.twitter.com/BSG_LABS www.linkedin.com/in/bsglabs...
by Clifford M Chapman, MS Izak B Dimenstein, MD   Book Review By Terence J. Harrist, MD Strata Dx,  Lexington, Massachusetts   The book “Dermatopathology Laboratory Techniques” should be useful to grossing technicians, physician assistants, pathology / dermatology residents and...
This blog is a followup to the previous article “The H&E Stain: Far From Routine”.  In that article, the basics of the routine hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain were discussed.  Now we shall discuss how to trouble shoot the routine...
[Editor’s note:  Segments of following blog are taken directly from an original article “The H&E Stain: Far from Routine” published by the author in Advance for Medical Professionals in April 2002.]   What exactly is a routine “H&E”?  And what...
Increased awareness of skin cancer has resulted in increased numbers of patients visiting their dermatologists.  When warranted, the dermatologist may perform a biopsy of any suspicious lesion and submit it to a pathology laboratory for diagnosis by a pathologist.  If...
In the previous Blog “Dermatopathology 101”, a clear outline of material was provided which ensured the skin’s histology presentation as an organ in the final microscope slide. We discussed basic skin histology, and important aspects of embedding and microtomy.  ...