Tissue Processing

Tissue Processing

Tissue processing begins with fixation. The fixative of choice in most histology laboratories is 10% neutral buffered formaldehyde (NBF). That is: this solution is made by diluting stock formaldehyde to a 10% concentration with phosphate buffer in the pH range of 7.0 to 7.4. Since stock formaldehyde is actually a 40% solution, the final chemical concentration of formaldehyde used in fixation is 4% formaldehyde.

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I just bought a new H&E stainer. How do I validate the new stainer, per CAP? I already traded in my old stainer, so I cant compare the two machines.

Congratulations on buying a new stainer. Don’t worry, there’s no need to compare the new machine with the old machine. After all, what proof do you have that the old machine was producing high quality H&E stained slides?

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Why Does the Third Container on my Tissue Processor Have White Granular Precipate in it?

Let’s review tissue processing for a moment, so we’re all on the same page. Tissue is received in the grossing room, cut into smaller pieces, placed in cassettes, and then placed in a fixative (in this case NBF) until placed on the tissue processor. Usually there is an extra one or two containers of NBF on the processor, to allow more fixation time during processing.

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